Families slam what they call Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s lack of response to opioid crisis

Global News Edmonton November 28, 2017

A network of Canadian families, whose loved ones have died due to substance use, has sent hundreds of photos and stories to the prime minister’s office in hopes of invoking an emotional response to the opioid crisis.

By sending the photos, Moms Stop the Harm was hoping to put a face to the significant number of people who have died in Canada as a result of the opioid crisis. “I don’t know if he cares about our children,” the project’s co-founder, Petra Schulz, told Global News.

Families slam what they call Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s lack of response to opioid crisis

Families mail photos of opioid victims to prime minister

Calgary Herald, November 16, 2017

Schulz, co-founder of advocacy group Moms Stop the Harm, is organizing a campaign to flood the prime minister’s office with hundreds of photographs of victims of the opioid crisis to mark National Addiction Awareness Week.

“We want him to shed a tear for our kids and we think these photos can do it,”

From left; Rosalind Davis, Petra Schulz, Leslie McBain and Donna May have all lost loved ones to the opioid crisis. On Tuesday they were joining hundreds of families across Canada sending photos of their loved ones with messages to the Prime Minister. The four gathered at an opioid conference as part of national addiction awareness week at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Calgary.

Families mail photos of opioid victims to prime minister

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Alberta group helps families affected by opioid crisis send photos of loved ones to prime minister

Metro News Calgary, November 14, 2017

Advocates and families affected by Canada's growing opioid crisis are launching a letter-writing campaign this week to pressure the federal government to take action – but instead of words, they’re using photographs to convey their message.

The 'Do Something Prime Minister Photo Campaign', organized by Moms Stop the Harm (MSTH) and the Alberta Foundation for Changing the Face of Addiction (AFCFA), is encouraging families to send photos of their loved ones who have died from opioid-related causes or who are seeking recovery from substance use to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s office in Ottawa.

“We need to see leadership at the top, starting with our prime minister,” said Petra Schulz, a co-founder of MSTH.

Alberta group helps families affected by opioid crisis send photos of loved ones to prime minister

Alberta approves pilot programs for injectable opioid therapy

Edmonton Journal, November 2, 2017

Albertans who have struggled with traditional forms of opioid treatment such as suboxone and methadone could soon have access to an injectable form of therapy.

These are recommendations from the Ministers Opioid Emergency Response Commission that Petra Schulz is a member of.

Alberta approves pilot programs for injectable opioid therapy

Tuesday's letters: MP misses point of safe injection sites

Edmonton Journal October 31, 2017

Supervised consumption services (SCS) primarily save lives, and anyone who has lost a loved one can tell you how important that is. We need to reduce stigma, provide good drug safety information and bring harm reduction, including needle exchanges, Naloxone distribution and opioid dependency treatment, closer to them in primary care. How we can make this happen should have been the topic of discussion.

Tuesday's letters: MP misses point of safe injection sites

Police warn more potentially lethal Halloween-stamped fentanyl blotters could be in Winnipeg

CBC News Manitoba, October 29, 2017

Petra Schulz, a co-founder of Moms Stop The Harm, said it's difficult for users to know the concentration of their drugs when they're packaged in blotters. "Every time when there are changes in the format of how something is presented, people are just at a much greater risk of overdose," she said.

Schulz said this type of packaging makes the drugs more attractive to users, especially for people "who haven't tried it out." Don't use drugs alone. Recognise the signs of an overdose. Carry Naloxone.

Police warn more potentially lethal Halloween-stamped fentanyl blotters could be in Winnipeg

Opinion: Science should guide local response to substance abuse

Elaine Hyska and Cameron Wild, October 23, 2017. Emonton Journal Opinion.

Last week, Health Canada issued the approvals to establish supervised consumption services in Edmonton. Scientific evidence consistently supports the individual and community benefits of these services, and local data demonstrate an urgent need for them in our inner city.

Opinion: Science should guide local response to substance abuse

Advocates urge Alberta curriculum overhaul to include education on opioids

Advocates spurred by concerning rates of opioid overdoses among Alberta youth are urging the government to improve grade-school education on drug use.

“It’s more important than ever that students learn this,” said Amy Graves, president of Get Prescription Drugs off the Street Society.

On Tuesday, Graves and Petra Schulz, co-founder of advocacy group Moms Stop the Harm which launched after Schulz’s son died from a fentanyl overdose in 2014, sent a letter asking Alberta’s health and education ministers to address the issue.

The Alberta government is midway through a curriculum redesign, with the first phases set to roll out next year.

Advocates urge Alberta curriculum overhaul to include education on opioids

Ignite Change workshop discusses prevention, harm reduction and other responses to youth drug crisis

Madeleine Cummings, Edmonton Examiner Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Petra Schulz, whose 25-year-old son, Danny, died of a fentanyl overdose in 2014, argued that society should be focused on the “demand” side of the problem, instead of the “supply” side. She also advocated for removing the stigma that surrounds addiction and mental illness and reducing harm for people who choose to use drugs.

Ignite Change workshop discusses prevention, harm reduction and other responses to youth drug crisis

Consultations to begin on Calgary's first supervised consumption site

Calgary Herald, June 14, 2017

Petra Schulz was on hand to endorse the announcement on behalf of MSTH and all families who's loved ones could have been saved with timely harm reduction and treatment.

Petra Schulz, who lost her 25-year-old son, Danny, to a fentanyl overdose in 2014, said she’s pleased Calgary is moving in the direction of supervised consumption services. But she added that while the service is “very much needed,” she also wants to see different solutions for drug users outside the downtown.

“We need to bring rapid access to treatment wherever people are . . . so this is great, but we can’t stop here,” she said.

“We need to move out, and not just in the suburban communities, the cities, but there are many rural Albertans that are using drugs and that need help.”

Consultations to begin on Calgary's first supervised consumption site

'Our aim ... is to keep people alive': Alberta invests $30M to deal with opioid crisis

CBC News Edmonton, May 31, 2017

The Alberta government is setting up a 14-member commission with a $30-million budget to deal with the skyrocketing numbers of deaths caused by overdoses of fentanyl and other opioids.... people involved in the commission include Petra Schulz, an Edmonton mother whose son died of a fentanyl overdose in 2014, Dr. Esther Tailfeathers, the physician lead for the Aboriginal Health Program with Alberta Health Services, and Marliss Taylor, the registered nurse who is program manager for Streetworks in Edmonton.

'Our aim ... is to keep people alive': Alberta invests $30M to deal with opioid crisis

New commission to guide opioid emergency response

Alberta Health, May 31, 2017

The province has established a dedicated emergency commission to help ramp up Alberta’s ability to respond to the opioid crisis.

“I’m pleased that the family voice is being included on the commission. My son Danny died of an accidental overdose. I don’t want one more family to suffer such a tragic loss. Today’s announcement gives hope that lives will be saved.”

Petra Schulz, Moms Stop The Harm and member, Minister’s Opioid Emergency Response Commission

New commission to guide opioid emergency response

Why did it take me 3 years to get my Naloxone kit?

It took me a long time to get my own kit, thankfully not for lack of access but because of the need to overcome my own feelings of guilt fur not having gone to Danny's house that night almost 3 years ago, and for not having known that naloxone existed. As a proponent of this live saving tool

I felt like a bit of a cheat not to have one. Well, I slayed another dragon in my grief process and am now the owner of a kit that I am proud to carry, but hope not to have reason to use. Do you have your own kit? Visit our resources page to find out where you can get your own kit.

Fentanyl is just the symptom. Who caused the crisis?

Petra Schulz, April 5, 2017

If you only read one article this month, make it this one please! Fentanyl is just the symptom, while the origin of the crisis has much do do with prescription practices and the lies the makers of Oxycontin used to make billions, while thousands have died. Our son Danny started opioids with prescription drugs he obtained on the illicit market, like many of his now dead peers. Others got the drugs from the Drs. with the same tragic outcome. But as it seems, some execs always find a way to make money, no matter what the "collateral damage is. I object if the "collateral damage" is my son or anyone child. Do you agree that Purdue pharma should be held accountable?